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Ancient Greek Clothing: Types of Attire

Ancient Greek Clothing has influenced fashion a great deal. This article explores different types of attire used in Ancient Greece.

Clothes formed an integral part of tradition in ancient Greece. Pale white was predominantly the color used for various occasions. The other colors that constituted a part of ancient Greek clothing were grey, violet, indigo, and a dark shade of purple. Garments woven from linen and wool were preferred in ancient times.

Ancient Greek Clothing has influenced fashion a great deal. This article explores different types of attire used in Ancient Greece.

Clothes formed an integral part of tradition in ancient Greece. Pale white was predominantly the color used for various occasions. The other colors that constituted a part of ancient Greek clothing were grey, violet, indigo, and a dark shade of purple. Garments woven from linen and wool were preferred in ancient times.

Artisans of the highest caliber worked to produce intricate work on leather used as accessories in the armor, shin, and arm protectors of esteemed individuals. The “Tunic” and the “cloak” were a common sight in ancient Greek attire.

The “Chiton” which formed an inner tunic and the “Himation”, a cloak, were worn by men and women in ancient Greece. Priests and Clergymen popularized the robe, which caught the eye of many in ancient times.

Headgear was an important part of dressing up in ancient times. The headgear comprised of decorative wreaths and caps worn to adorn and complement clothes worn in those times. Diadems were worn to symbolize royalty and status of an individual.

Types of Attire

Chiton
This garment was worn by men and women in ancient Greece. Chiton comprised of two styles, The Doric and The Iconic. The Doric chiton was less complicated with the absence of sleeves. This garment was draped from the shoulder with few fibulae and broaches holding the garment together. It could be draped plain or as an overfold known as “apotygma” or “kolpos”. The Iconic chiton was draped with a small overfold, and at times without a fold from the neck up to the wrist and held together with a small variety of pins. A zoster or a girdle was worn at times to hold the garment firmly at the waist. Women preferred the ankle length chiton, while men took a liking to the knee length ones.

Chlamys
In ancient Greece, soldiers wore this rectangular woolen garment, either wrapped over a piece of clothing or over their bare bodies. Pins held this garment secure at the right shoulder of the individual wearing it. Chlamy’s were wrapped in different ways, either across or over the shoulders. This type of clothing shielded soldiers from the biting cold and served as a light protective cover during combat.

Peplos
This tubular piece of cloth was a Greek garment worn by women during the classical period. The style of draping this garment differed according to the choice of the individual. It was most commonly worn with an inside-out fold at the top running down to the waist and further extending towards the ankles. The drape of this garment created an illusion of two pieces of cloth used in weaving this garment. The visual appeal accompanied by the clean flow of this garment gave simplicity and style a new meaning.

Himation
In ancient Greece, the Himation which was an apparel used for outdoors was mostly made from a rectangular piece of thickly woven wool. The flowing ends of this garment were reminiscent to a modern day cloak. This garment could also be worn over a chiton and could be draped over the individuals head or shoulders. This garment was worn by both sexes in ancient Greece.

Abolla
This was a garment similar to a cloak, worn in ancient times. Although it was initially used in combat, and represented a kind of military uniform, the Abolla soon found its way in everyday use.

Petruges
Skilled artisans were involved in making this garment; Petruges was a flared leather skirt designed in the form of strips that resembled a bird’s feather. This form of clothing was worn by military officers’ and. soldiers in ancient times.

Fustanella
Although the design of this skirt, evolved in ancient times, it was initially worn as a knee-length pleated skirt made of linen. In the later years the length of the skirt differed and pleats made way for other styles. In ancient Greece, folk dancers and The Evzones, (military units) wore the Fustanella extensively.

The designs and styles of ancient Greek clothing are used in the world of fashion even today and are a testimony to the fact that simplicity and flow are the key ingredients in fashion.
 


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